The best chocolate in the world for the New York Times
The best chocolate in the world for the New York Times
Anonim

Forget i Mast Brothers and their magheggi, the controversies on the raw chocolate (like Raaka), the results of the International Chocolate Awards exciting for Italians: artisan chocolate best in the world ”Would be in another hemisphere.

At least according to the New York Times, usually not inclined to such peremptory definitions, but which this time has been spent on Marou, a Vietnamese chocolate.

Subtropical scenery, from the Mekong delta you go up the intricate forests: if you remember some scenes from Il Cacciatore the comparison is automatic. Right there, in the late 19th century, the French imported the cocoa cultivation, who lived a flourishing youth during the years of the cold war, as the USSR was buying it up.

Today Marou, Faiseurs de Chocolate is the only chocolate artisan of Ho Chi Min (the former mythical Saigon), indeed of the whole Vietnam.

It has belonged since 2011 to Samuel Maruta, a former teacher and Vincent Marou, a former company manager, both of French origin and both in Vietnam first out of passion, then conquered by a submerged world of perfumes, differences and possibilities.

The New York Times talks about Marou chocolate, whose cocoa beans are harvested on the island of Phu Tan Dong, as unlike any other.

marou, chocolate, broad beans
marou, chocolate, broad beans
Marou, cocoa bags
Marou, cocoa bags
marou chocolate
marou chocolate

The cocoa used - called Trinitario - is a blend born from a hybridization of the Forastero type (robust and productive cocoa, inexpensive) and the rare Criollo (noble, delicate, high quality cocoa). The beans are still harvested with the outer pod, colorful and lively. They are then opened and placed in wooden crates to allow the seeds, covered with a white and fatty substance, to ferment for six days. This is followed by the drying phase in the sun on bamboo mats.

Subsequently the seeds are toasted, from here on the production follows the classic pattern of craftsmanship.

The result is a chocolate with unusual aromas: the American newspaper reports formidable aromas of licorice or tobacco.

The wrapping of the tablets, the most powerful marketing tool in the hands of artisan producers, are baroque but elegant - inspired by the colonial art of the early twentieth century.

marou chocolate
marou chocolate
marou chocolate
marou chocolate
marou chocolate
marou chocolate
marou chocolate
marou chocolate

Although the processing of chocolate is influenced by the French origin of Marou and Maruta, the two founders, and by European processing techniques (such as conching, through which the cocoa mass is melted at a temperature of about eighty degrees making the surface), it cannot be denied that Marou chocolate is essentially Vietnamese.

It is so in its origin, in the use of local and sustainable raw materials, in respect for the delicate environment in which it is located.

Popular by topic