Table of contents:

Stefano Callegari: what is it like to be mr. trapizzino
Stefano Callegari: what is it like to be mr. trapizzino

Video: Stefano Callegari: what is it like to be mr. trapizzino

Video: Stefano Callegari: what is it like to be mr. trapizzino
Video: La pizza cacio e pepe cotta con il ghiaccio di Stefano Callegari 2023, December
Anonim

Who do you want to be when you grow up? If you say an astronaut you are trivial, and keep in mind that "myself" is not valid.

An original answer might be " Stefano Callegari". Reaching 48 with three restaurants a Rome (I take it out, Round And I break free) and a gourmet street food chain will not be the dream of all children, but many would put their signature on it, as they say.

Above all for the prospects of earnings, okay, also for the pride of having given Roman pizza a new face and having transformed a triangle of pasta into a traditional take-away cooking show. And from export.

In case you don't understand, we're talking about the trapizzino, the non-pizza filled with typically Roman specialties, with four locations in the capital (Testaccio, Ponte Milvio, Cinema Adriano in Piazza Cavour and Termini Station, in the new Central Market).

Then two in franchising in Ladispoli and Trevignano and two more in Japan, in Kanazawa and Tokyo. Yes, Callegari and his team were there to teach the Japanese how to queue up for vaccinara & Co.

And there are four new openings on the way, two more in Rome, then Florence and New York.

For all this and more we decided to get to know you better Mr. Trapizzino, to understand what lies behind his most brilliant ideas.

We went to visit him at Sbanco, a pizzeria with kitchen in via Siria 1 opened in Rome with Marco Pucciotti (partner of other places such as Epiro, BarleyWine, Hop & Pork) and Giovanni Campari of the Birrificio del Ducato.

I dig
I dig
I dig
I dig

Callegari has such a calm and peaceful attitude that one wonders if it was he who opened all these places, but on the contrary a lively and contagious enthusiasm every time we talk about recipes.

Or of that time when, in 2008, the trapizzino was invented in a pizzeria by the slice just opened in Testaccio.

"I wanted to make stuffed pizza my way and after many attempts I decided to use the corner of the dough disc to make it into a pocket", he explains.

trapizzino
trapizzino

In the beginning it was chicken cacciatore, then all the other flavors. Let's talk about trapizzino fillings of course: cuttlefish and peas with tomato, tongue in green sauce, pork frying pan (pork neck with the aromas of porchetta), double cream (burrata with anchovies), Roman salad (that is, garlic, oil and chilli), just to name a few.

Another classic, the stuffed meatballs with sauce, could suggest the worker's meal brought from home, in fact the triangular foil that has become a symbol of trapizzino recalls the mason's hat, but we say this.

Prices, meanwhile, are rising. In Termini the "dripping cone" costs 4 euros (against the usual 3.50) as will soon happen in the other clubs. Little consolation: a trapizzino in Japan costs twice as much.

trapizzino
trapizzino
trapizzino
trapizzino

But the trapizzino, although a goose that lays golden eggs, is only a happy parenthesis in Callegari's career.

It was he who brought new life to the classic Roman pizza, the famous scrocchiarella, suffering from the overwhelming power of Neapolitan and gourmet pizza, the novelty of which the North has become the spokesperson in recent years: naturally leavened, with ground flours stone, with a higher thickness and a different texture.

The path taken by the Roman pizza maker has to do with an obsessive care of the doughs and fillings that overcome all resistances, especially those of his fellow citizens. Think for example of the Rosettone pizza: a pizza that replicates the shape of the rosetta, the typical Roman bread, complete with five lumps in the center.

rosettone out of the oven
rosettone out of the oven

Or to get out of Rome for once, think about Greenwich pizza, the filling of which derives from the custom of English sailors to preserve the cheese in wine to protect it from mice.

Mozzarella, Stilton (an English blue cheese inserted both in cooking and raw) and a reduction of Ruby port, the more fruity and less woody one.

greenwich, I go out
greenwich, I go out
greenwich, I go out
greenwich, I go out

But the best of Callegari pizza chefs are the remakes of the aristocracy of guanciale, of the nobility of black pepper, of the patrician of pecorino, that is bacon and egg And Cheese and pepper.

The Carbonara pizza, for example, is surprisingly similar in aromas to the pasta dish.

It is cooked together with the bacon, which releases the fat on the pasta and becomes crunchy.

Raw instead, the pizza is topped with a cream consisting of two egg yolks and a whole egg, then beaten pecorino ("with a fork eh, which must remain coarse, no mixer, all that air is useless", Callegari specifies) and black pepper.

carbonara, I dig
carbonara, I dig
carbonara, I dig
carbonara, I dig

But to tell you how Sbanco's pizza is made, from A to Z, we opted for the non plus ultra of reinterpretation.

Another “Roman” pasta but this time more difficult to replicate in the pizza version. Why the cheese and pepper it must "remain moist and" jam the throat ", while keeping the pecorino dry.

Before discovering what Callegari has studied to solve the problem, let's start with the dough.

How to make sforno cheese and pepper pizza at home

One and a half liters of water for one and a half kilograms of flour (00, with 20% semi-wholemeal), 3% salt, 2% oil and then two yeasts.

Mother yeast that ensures the aromas and an almost “lemony” acidulous part, as well as making the dough lighter and crunchy; brewer's yeast that does its part for the growth of the dough.

The order of the ingredients, the strength of the flour and the patience to add it little by little are essential.

I dig the dough
I dig the dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough

The dough is prepared in the afternoon to be ready the following evening after resting for 30 hours at 12 degrees.

The result is a cream, in the true sense of the word: Callegari speaks to us of "70% hydration" with the arched eyebrow of someone who implies significant percentages.

callegari, dough
callegari, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough

Then the loaves are made, those already dosed to become pizzas: weight 120/150 grams each.

So an interesting trick: leave them in front of the wood oven for 2-3 hours to make them grow as much as possible.

I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough
I dig, dough

And so far the pizza is the same as the others from Sbanco. For the cacio e pepe, however, you need to raise a little frame around the pizza.

The reason is as wacky as it is ingenious: because during cooking the only ingredient is ice.

And as you can imagine, without the ledge to stem the water, it would come out as soon as it melted.

sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper

But we haven't told you why the ice is. It is used to make the surface moist.

While the pizza is cooking, the water keeps the dough slightly wet and the cornice rises, ready to host the raw pecorino, in very generous doses.

sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper

The result is a moist layer, which acts as a buffer between the dough and the dry cheese spread on the surface.

Just like in spaghetti with cheese and pepper, with their final sprinkling.

sbanco, cacio e pepe, callegari
sbanco, cacio e pepe, callegari
sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper
sbanco, cheese and pepper

The result is this: do you like it?

Recommended: